Kitchen Chemistry :: Week 2 :: Chocolate

We will be working with chocolate this week!!!

Read the following from the textbook: pp. 694-712, 430-433, 647-52, 674-675, and 533-34.

Answer the following questions

Kitchen Chemistry Homework #2 

Chocolate specific: 

1. Do you enjoy chocolate? Is there a biochemical reason for it? 

2. What are some of the chemicals that contribute to the chocolate taste? 

3. Can we become addicted to chocolate? 

4. What is common to both marijuana and chocolate? 

5. Even though it is unhealthy, can we justify from a health perspective eating chocolate in moderation? 

6. What is the ingredient in chocolate that makes our hearts pound? 

7. Should you feed your cat or dog chocolate? Why or why not? 

Ingredient specific questions: 

1. What is the chemistry behind baking powder? At what temperature does this process become spontaneous (remember Gibb’s free energy equations from thermodynamics?) 

2. What does double acting baking powder really mean? 

3. Why add eggs to the recipe? 

4. What is the difference between brown sugar and white sugar? 

5. Where does vanilla come from and how is the extract made? 

6. What modifications did you make to the recipe? 

Chemistry Day 1

The Chemistry course is going to be based on the MIT class: Kitchen Chemistry

Welcome to the seminar entitled Kitchen Chemistry. This is a Pass/Fail, 6-unit seminar (2 hours of class and 4 hours of reading and homework per week). This seminar is designed to look at cooking from a scientific basis. Each week we will do an edible experiment and look at the science behind how it all works. Not only will chemical principles be examined, but also biochemical, biological, microbiological, and maybe even a little physics. Students are required to attend at least 80% of the classes.
This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

From Kitchen Chemistry Syllabus

I need to order the textbooks for everyone. In the meantime, you can visit the course website and watch the intro videos.
https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/experimental-study-group/es-287-kitchen-chemistry-spring-2009/syllabus/

Chem Team

We will meet on Thursday morning around 10:30am. We will do some bonding review and work on examples using the periodic table. We will also research some experiments/demos we can do next week.

Chem Team

Back to Bonding…Image result for bonding chemistryLet’s meet Tuesday morning to compare two common types of chemical bonds – ionic and covalent. We also need some volunteers to demonstrate experiments on chemistry of monsters and cyanotyping at the end of the week. Supplies are here and ready to go.

Ionic Bonds Tutorial – click “launch”

Assignment from S. Frye, Due 1/13

Students,

Think about these questions deeply – talk to your parents and friends about them before you answer or do some research if you need to.  E-mail your answers back to me by Friday the 13th. Answering these questions is a required task for 2nd semester.
1. What are you going to learn?
2. How are you going to learn it?
3. How are you going to show me you are learning?
I know this is open-ended and will be hard for some of you, but go for it anyway.  I am not looking for answers like “I’m going to learn what you teach me.”
I’m looking forward to seeing you tomorrow!
Sandy
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